There was &quot;talk&quot; back then from activists for the disabled but no official consideration of making the entire trail accessible, just some segments. The same went on in other wilderness areas. In the Adirondacks there was a group that insisted that any trail open to hikers should be open to disabled people on ATVs. They got some concessions on old RR beds and a few relatively short &amp; flat sections but the reality was/is that many parts of the trails can not be made handicap accessible without major engineering projects after which it wouldn&#39;t be anything approaching wilderness anymore.<br>
<br clear="all">Jim Bullard<br><a href="http://jims-ramblings.blogspot.com/">http://jims-ramblings.blogspot.com/</a><br><a href="http://members.photoportfolios.net/Jim_Bullard">http://members.photoportfolios.net/Jim_Bullard</a><br>
<a href="http://www.photoshelter.com/c/jim_bullard">http://www.photoshelter.com/c/jim_bullard</a><br>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Feb 14, 2010 at 10:50 AM, Ryan Crawford <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:m2b1@earthlink.net">m2b1@earthlink.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
&gt;From what I remember, back when I thru-hiked in 1997 there was talk a<br>
movement to make the AT handicap accessible. ¬†Yes, pave the entire AT.<br>
Whatever became of it???<br>
<br>
Okay, so I am a month and a half early, but it was either on the radio or in<br>
print back in 97...yes about a month and a half from now.<br>
<br>
MEANT 2B<br></blockquote><br></div><br>