<html>
<head>
<style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 10pt;
font-family:Verdana
}
--></style>
</head>
<body class='hmmessage'>
<BR>David:<BR><BR>&gt; I don't "get" the logic of the Volokh Conspiracy blog to which you linked.<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
I didn't either - at first. Not sure I agree with it entirely either.&nbsp; But I'm <BR>
"thinking" - and that is truly dangerous.&nbsp; <BR>
<BR>&gt; If I understand it correctly, the author says we have individual<BR>&gt; rights protected by the constitution, and since these rights are<BR>&gt; unfettered individually, they should also be unfettered when we<BR>&gt; organize ourselves as corporations; otherwise, if we limit corporate<BR>&gt; rights, we'll inexorably limit our individual rights.<BR><BR>
Both corporations and individual "citizens" are constructs (i.e. - "state <BR>
created entities").&nbsp; Therefore, what can be done to corporations can be <BR>
done to individual citizens.&nbsp; <BR>
<BR>&gt; This makes no logical sense to me.<BR><BR>
Hey, we're talking "law" here - not "logic.&nbsp; :) <BR>
<BR>&gt; Our individual rights protected by the constitution are not unfettered<BR>&gt; rights: all our "rights" are circumscribed: even our individual right<BR>&gt; to assemble and speak freely, is regulated in time, place, and manner.<BR>&gt; Individually. Never mind when organize. Our right to "assemble" is<BR>&gt; limited by the constitution solely to the end of petitioning the<BR>&gt; government: it isn't absolute. So, our individual rights are already<BR>&gt; circumscribed, and regulating the corporate organization isn't going<BR>&gt; to change that one bit. It's foolish to think otherwise.<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
Hmm - to the extent that our rights are circumscribed, it's either because <BR>
the circumscription is legislatively imposed (and therefore unconstitutional) <BR>
or because we've done it to ourselves by voluntary regulation that we've <BR>
accepted as normal (but may still be unconstitutional) or because the <BR>
restrictions are dictated voluntarily by common sense and courtesy.&nbsp; <BR>
To my knowledge, the "fetters" you mention are not found in the Constitution. <BR>
The Constitutional debates left no room for fetters on the rights that the <BR>
Colonies demanded as a price for ratification of the Constitution.&nbsp; <BR>
If the fetters&nbsp;are there, please educate me.&nbsp; <BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
I believe that all the fetters on our rights that you indicate are true - but only <BR>
because, as a people, we've come to accept them.&nbsp; But I believe a strict <BR>
constitutional interpretation would find most of those fetters to be <BR>
unconstitutional.&nbsp; <BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
In this case it would appear that the Court agrees with that view.&nbsp; I wonder <BR>
what would happen if Roe vs Wade were to be reconsidered? <BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
However, if you want to discuss this further, I'd suggest we do it privately. <BR>
I'm still&nbsp; of two minds about all this - and willing to talk about it.&nbsp; But not here. <BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
Walk softly,<BR>
Jim<BR>                                               </body>
</html>